Passport Intervention Exercise Information

Schedules

Dallas: Garland Convention Center, 1931 E. Centerville Rd Garland, TX 75041 (March 29 – April 2)

Houston: Nigerian Foundation Inc, 6260 Westpark Dr,Suite 240 Houston,TX 77057 (April 3 – April 6)

Requirements

1. Administrative charge of Sixty dollars ($60) per passport applicant in postal money order addressed to “Consulate General of Nigeria, Atlanta”

2. Completed Online APPLICATION FORM from the Nigerian Immigration Services website (Please bring the print out)

3. Online PAYMENT SLIP (Please bring the print out)

4. Online ACKNOWLEDGEMENT SLIP (Please bring the print out)

5. One Passport Photo

6. Presentation of old Nigerian passport (the last passport issued).

7. Copy of data page of last passport issued.

8. For MINORS who are applying for the first time, in addition to 1-5 above, please bring the following items:

i. Duly signed and dated letter of consent from both parents.
ii. Data pages of both parents’ passports
iii. Copy of Birth Certficate

NOTE: Minors who have obtained Nigerian passport in the past need only to comply with 1-7 above

9. ALL Applicants acquiring Nigerian passport for the first time, will in addition to 1-5 above, provide the following items:

i. Copy of Birth Certificate
ii. Copy of data page of the Nigeria Passport of their parents or their grandparents

10. A self-addressed prepaid USPS Express envelope for mailing back the passport(s).

11. Money order of Three Hundred and Seventy dollars ($370) for penalty fee, and a police report is required for lost passport cases.

NOTE: Passport re-issue cases will not be treated during intervention exercises. Applicants are advised to come to the consulate for passport re-issue processing.

NIGERIAN CONSULATE, ATLANTA/NIDOA – ATLANTA CHAPTER CONVENTION & EMPOWERMENT DAY AUG 31ST 2013

The Nigerians in Diaspora Organization Americas (NIDOA), Atlanta Chapter, in partnership with the Consulate General of Nigeria-Atlanta, Georgia is delighted to extend a special invitation to you.  NIDOA – Atlanta Chapter is hosting its first Annual NIDOA-ATLANTA Chapter Convention & Empowerment Day on August 31, 2013 and will be honored to have your presence as a Special Guest of honor.

Read More…

TRANSFORMATION AGENDA

 

Goodluck Jonathan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Transformation Agenda is the 1st National Implementation Plan (NIP), aims to deepen the effects and provide a sense of direction for the current administration over the next four years. The agenda is based on a set of priority policies and programmes which when implemented will transform the Nigerian Economy to meet the future needs of the Nigerian people. The Transformation Agenda is President Goodluck Jonathan’s key priority policies, programmes and projects, with which he hopes to turn the country around by 2015.

PRESIDENT Goodluck Jonathan rode to power on the back of a promised transformation agenda, which he is virtually set to get off the ground. Throughout his campaign, he refrained from making specific pledges, only speaking, in the main, about his intention to change the ways things were done and give the country a new sense of direction. The transformation agenda is planned for between 2011 and 2015, which is the duration of the present administration and it is necessitated by the need to correct the flaws in the country’s drive for development where there is absence of long-term perspective, and lack of continuity, consistency and commitment (3Cs) to agreed policies. This government believes that the culminating effect of these has been growth and development of the Nigerian economy without a concomitant improvement in the overall welfare of Nigerian citizens.

To the Jonathan administration, the disregard for these 3Cs has resulted in rising unemployment, inequality and poverty and it is therefore hard pressed to come with a holistic transformation of the Nigerian state with a strategy that gives cognizance to these 3Cs in the duration of the administration.

Government based the Transformation Agenda and draws its inspiration from the Vision 20:2020 and the first National Implementation Plan (NIP) according to the summary of federal key priority policies, programmes. It aims to deepen the effects and provide a sense of direction. The agenda is based on a set of priority policies and programmes which, when implemented, would transform the Nigerian economy to meet the future needs of the people.

  • Macroeconomic framework and economic direction

Government is projecting a baseline GDP growth rate of 11.7 per cent per annum for the period 2011-2015, as it hopes that it will translate to real and nominal GDP of about N428.6billion and N73.2trillion respectively at the end of the programme period. It assumes that the projected GDP growth of the period will be driven largely by the oil and gas, solid minerals, agriculture, ICT equipment and softwares, telecommunication, wholesale and retail trade, tourism and entertainment, manufacturing and building and construction sectors.

A total investment of N40.75trillion in nominal terms is also projected for the period. The public sector will account for N24.45trillion or 60 per cent, while the remaining N16.30trillion or 40 per cent is expected to be invested by the private sector. Overall, public sector investment plan is made up of N11.59 trillion for states and local governments respectively.

The key policies to be pursued by government during the programme period are as follows: a. Ensuring greater harmony between fiscal and monetary policy. In this regard, the National Economic Management Team will be strengthened to facilitate effective coordination of fiscal and monetary policies.

b. Pursuit of sound macroeconomic policies, including fiscal prudence supported by appropriate monetary policy to contain inflation at single digit.

c. The budget process shall be reviewed to provide greater clarity of roles between the executive and legislature and to ensure that the appropriation bill is enacted into law within the first month of any year. The direction of policy shall draw inspiration from the US system and concentrate on setting allocation priorities rather than micro-budgeting or contesting figures with the executive.

d. The existing revenue allocation formula shall be reviewed to achieve a more balanced fiscal federalism. This is expected to pave the way for more effective implementation of programmes at the subnational level.

e. Institutionalising the culture of development planning at all levels of government and ensuring that the annual capital budget allocation takes a cue from medium and long term development plans. Towards this end, government wants the National Assembly to expedite the passage of the Planning and Project Continuity Bill in order to strengthen the Plan-Budget link and reduce the high incidence of abandoned projects.

  • Job creation

Government will pursue certain policy measures to reinvigorate various sectors of the economy and enhance their employment generating potentials, including implementing a youth employment safety net support programme that includes conditional cash transfer and vocational training; development of industrial clusters; reviewing of university curricular to align with industry job requirements and promotion of apprenticeship/work experience programmes and joint ventures; enforcement of mandatory sub-contracting and partnering with locals by foreign construction companies and implementation of mandatory skills transfer to Nigerians by foreign construction companies.

  • Public expenditure management

Government is concerned that the sub-optimality of the expenditure profile of the Federal Government of Nigeria since 1999 has seen recurrent spending consistently crowded out capital expenditure, exacerbating the already abysmal state of infrastructure. Recurrent expenditure has fluctuated between 47.5% in 1999 to 80.29 per cent in 2003, while capital expenditure accounted for only 19.71 per cent of total government expenditure. It notes that it has since increased continually to a nigh of 38.37 per cent of total expenditure in 2009. It has grown much worse in 2011 with government borrowing to finance recurrent expenditures. To remedy the situation, under the transformation agenda, government will entrench a culture of accountability by beginning to sanction and prosecute officers that breach established financial management rules and regulations. The monetization policy will also be strictly enforced.

  • Governance

The Transformation Agenda’s policies on governance are motivated by Nigeria’s inability to decisively tackle most development challenges such as poverty, unemployment, security and deplorable state of infrastructure. These include political governance, economic governance, corporate governance and effectiveness of institutions. During the life of this administration, the policies and programmes directed at addressing governance challenges, will focus on the public service; security, law and order; the legislature; anti-corruption measures and institution; the judiciary; economic coordination and support for private investment. The critical policy thrust of governance will be to maximise the benefits the citizenry derive from governance through more effective and efficient use of public resources, proper financial management and fiscal prudence. This entails adequate emphasis on the attainment of law and order, guarantee of safety of lives and property and the provision of an environment in which people find happiness and fulfilment.

  • Justice and judiciary

The policy thrusts of the justice and judiciary sector will be achieving greater independence for the judiciary in terms of funding, improving capacity and efficiency in judicial service delivery, eliminating all forms of corruption in the administration of justice in Nigeria, enhancing the capacity of the justice ministry to superintend prosecution and improving professionalism in legal practice for better service delivery.

  • Foreign policy and economic diplomacy

Nigeria’s foreign missions are to be properly focused and well funded in order to meet the foreign policy goals of the country. Government may rationalise missions and appoint honorary consuls to deal with consular issues in areas where Nigeria’s interest does not loom large as practiced by other countries.

  • Legislature

Under the planned period, the thrust of the policy will be to facilitate the creation of a dynamic, constitutionally effective and public responsive legislature that is proactive in its legislative duties and independent but aware of its constitutional partnership with the executive and judicial arms of government. Other policy measures include regular auditing of the activities and publication of annual reports of the national and state legislatures to promote greater transparency and accountability in the use of public funds; promote greater public interest in the scrutiny of legislative actions; and inform public debate to these ends. Attention will be paid to human capital development policies, programmes and projects because of government’s belief that investing in human capital development is critical.

  • Education

Under Priority Policies for the Development of Education, the Jonathan administration will promote primary enrollment of all children of school-going age, irrespective of the income profile of the policies; engage in the provision of infrastructure such as classrooms across all levels, so as to ease over-crowding, increase access and reduce pupil/teacher ratio; and enhance the efficiency, resourcefulness and competence of teachers and other education al personnel through training, capacity building and motivation.

  • Health sector

For the health sector, the underpinning policy for the inputs towards achieving the human capital development goal of the Vision 20: 2020 strategy is the National Strategic Health Development Plan (NSHDP). The NSHDP is the vehicle for actions at all levels of the health care delivery system which seeks to foster the achievement of the MDGs and other local and international targets and declaration commitments.

  • Labour and productivity

Here, the agenda is to focus on the implementation of the National Action Plan on Employment Creation (NAPEC) targeted at creating five million new jobs annually within the next three years, establishment of more skills acquisition centres; implementation of local content policy in all the sectors, especially in the oil and gas industry in order to boost job creation in the country.

The transformation agenda also provides for Key Policies for the Real Sector under the plan period. Its policies for developing the seven growth drivers are agriculture and food security, manufacturing, and oil and gas. Under agriculture and food security, apart from securing food and the food needs of the country, government will enhance generation of national and social wealth through greater export and import substitution, enhance capacity for value addition leading to industrialization and employment opportunities, and ensures efficient exploitation and utilization of available agricultural resources; and enhance the development and dissemination of appropriate and efficient technologies for rapid adoption.

Under manufacturing, the agenda seeks to promote private sector investments through the creation of an enabling environment that allows for substantial improvement in efficiency, productivity and profitability, significantly increase local manufacturing local content and linkages with other sectors of the economy, ensure global competitiveness for manufactured goods, make Nigerian manufactured goods major foreign exchange earners and achieve rapid and sustained economic growth through broadening of the nation’s productive base.

In oil and gas, the focus will also be on the promotion of private sector investment in both the upstream and downstream activities of the oil and gas, deregulation of the industry and promotion of environmentally friendly oil and gas exploration and exploitation methods; strengthening capacity building programmes especially in core technical areas; provision of funding mechanisms for pre-bidding geosciences and surveys of deep-water offshore, gas flare-down to reduce pollutions and increase supply for domestic use and power generation, and local content development.

  • Infrastructure policies, programmes and projects

Government will seek to address the infrastructure deficit in the country in key development areas such as power, transportation, housing, Information Communication Technology (ICT),Federal Capital Territory ( FCT) and Niger Delta.

The Transformation Agenda stresses the critical importance of these areas in the national development. Between 2011 and 2015, key priority policies will be pursued to develop infrastructure and consequently engender sustained growth and development in the country.

  • Power

Government envisages that the total proposed investment in the power sector during the period is about N1, 896 trillion. This will cover investments in four areas of power generation, transmission, distribution and alternative energy. This expenditure aims at increasing generation and transmission capacity in order to provide adequate and sustainable power, intensifying rural electrification efforts in a more efficient manner; and achieving optimal energy mix using the most appropriate technology.

The strategies to be adopted in achieving these include creating a deregulated and competitive electric power sector to attract foreign and local investments; ensuring a viable commercial framework for the electric power sector including a tariff regime that promotes transparency, guarantees security of investments and a reasonable rate of return on investments; ensuring the transmission capacity and providing redundancies in the transmission system so as to ensure a fully integrated network that minimizes transmission losses while strengthening grid security.

  • Information and Communication Technology

The proposed investment for the ICT sector between 2011 and 2015 is N22.2 billion. The agenda will focus on the development of a national Knowledge Based Economy (KBE) 10-year Strategy Plan, sustained human capacity development in ICT; creation of a favourable and friendly investment and enterprise environment through transparency in tax systems, anti-trust laws, incentives and trade policies that would stimulate local and foreign investments in ICT, as well as development of infrastructure, particularly global connectivity as a prerequisite to leveraging the benefits of the global economy, improving domestic productivity and attracting foreign investments. Other strategies are: creation of an enabling environment through appropriate policies, legal, regulatory and institutional frameworks and enhancing Public -Private Partnership (PPP) in project funding, financing and management.

  • Niger Delta

As for Niger Delta, the proposed investment in the region during the Plan period is N335.05 billion. The main policy thrust will be to entrench peace and stability to drive sustainable socio-economic development in the area with the aim of reducing the high incidence of poverty, high rate of unemployment and high level of insecurity.

  • Transportation

Government expects total investment for the transport sector during the period 2011-2015 to be approximately N4, 465 billion. The investment would cover roads, railways, inland waterways, ports and airports development. The main policy thrust during the Plan period is to evolve a multimodal, integrated and sustainable transport system, with greater emphasis on rail and inland waterways transportation. An enabling environment for Public-Private Partnership (PPP) is being created by designing new policies, legislation and institutional framework that would support the envisaged transformation of the sector.

The transformation agenda ‘s key priority projects are derived from 20 Ministries, Department and Agencies (MDAs) and sectors where a total of 1613 projects were identified, out of which 385 are new while 1361 are ongoing.

Libelous Publication Against Consulate-General of Nigeria, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

March 18, 2011

The Editor
The Punch,
1, Olu Aboderin Street,
Onipetesi, P.M.B 21204,
Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

LIBELOUS PUBLICATION

The attention of this Consulate-General has been drawn to a damaging, libelous, and ridiculous feature entitled, “Alleged Exploitation at Nigerian Embassy in the US” written by one Gbenga Adeniji and contained in your daily edition of Thursday, March 17, 2011. In this publication, you erroneously described the Nigerian legation in 8060 Roswell Road, Atlanta, Georgia USA as an Embassy, which we are not. You claimed that “the embassy oozes Nigeria”, that for those “who intend to process their travel documents”, our Mission sees “it as an opportunity to exploit them to the maximum”.
2. Furthermore, you stated that “like merchants the officials are accused of asking the applicants to purchase envelopes from the Embassy while a printout costs $5”. We have no grudge with your claim that “a Nigerian guy in another building” transacts whatever business he chooses with his fellow Nigerians at whatever cost suits his purpose. Perhaps, if your newspaper established since the 70s could be a bit painstaking, it would have seen the posting in the website of the Consulate-General of Nigeria, Atlanta Georgia, USA that this Mission has no office annex within or outside its premises and that whoever does business with such an outfit does so purely in his or her own interest.
3. It is sad and highly unedifying for your highly revered newspaper to engage in a campaign of calumny and disdain against an establishment without cross checking and double checking your facts. The conclusion of this your unfortunate article in which you “accused us of not processing forms according to given dates and not giving directions on where to put the forms’” is the greatest height of yellow journalism. It is instructive for you to tarry awhile and weigh the consequences of your libelous publication in an era in which several government agencies may be looking for scapegoats in an environment where innocent civil servants bear the brunt of sensational reportage like this publication which is grossly inaccurate and false in its entirety.
4. The wish is yours, Editor, if you would choose the path of honor to verify your facts before going to press and in this case, published an inaccurate rejoinder to exculpate us of your libel and damaging unnecessary exposure to public ridicule and contempt. Let it be known to you that apart from our disclaimer on our website of any underhand dealings, the United States of America is a law and order society which does not practice business as usual. Anyone, be it Nigerian or of any other nationality is not a sacred cow when it comes to unfair business practices but please dissociate this Consulate-General from collusion with anyone wherever to defraud anyone.
5. As civil servants, we may be incapacitated to institute a libel suit against you but your conscience shall be your judge and you will meet your match in your avowed destructive mission if this is your objective.

6. Best regards.

CONSULATE-GENERAL OF NIGERIA,
ATLANTA,GEORGIA, USA.
MARCH 18,2011

NEW PAYMENT PROCEDURE FOR E-PASSPORT FEES

It has come to the notice of this Consulate-General and as has been noticed by fellow nationals that the previous online mode of payment for new e-Passports has been suspended. The new method observed is that Money Orders would substitute for the online payment via credit card of US$65.00 and such money order would be addressed and mailed to SW Global LLC, 50 Albany Turnpike, Canton, CT 06019.

This organization would in turn post a payment confirmation advice to the applicant’s e-mail address provided in the transaction, the applicant would download this confirmation with other e-Passport forms filled online and present himself/herself to the Consulate-General in Atlanta for Biometric Data Capturing pursuant to the issuance of an e-Passport. For purposes of clarity, the only change in the e-Passport issuance procedure is the method of payment of the US$65.00 e-Passport application fee, while all other processes involved in the issuance of these passports remain unchanged.

Fellow nationals are advised to adhere strictly to this new payment method of the US$65.00 as no other method of payment shall be accepted. If this procedure is disregarded, the application form procedure shall be impeded and inchoate. However, this change does not affect the US$30.00 administrative charges in Money Order payable to the Consulate-General of Nigeria in Atlanta. It is strictly advised that the Money Order shall as usual accompany the submission of application form and appearance at the Consulate-General for completion of the application procedure.

It is assumed that the circumstances that led to this new method shall be addressed in due course and a less cumbersome and less tedious mode of payment shall be re-introduced.

Consulate-General of Nigeria,

Atlanta, Georgia

03/17/2011

USAfrica special: NOLLYWOOD and African-theme Movies in the Diaspora. By Chudi Okafor

The Importance and Growth of Nollywood and African Theme Movies in the Diaspora.

Special Remarks by Hon. CHUDI OKAFOR, the Consul-General of the Federal Republic of Nigeria to the

Hon. Chudi Okafor speaking at the Dishnetwork event. USAfricaPhoto2010

United States of America, at the DishNetwork launch of its African Bouquet channels, hosted by USAfrica multimedia networks, Houston, on Monday December 20, 2010 at the Hilton Hotels southwest.

Special & Exclusive to USAfrica,
USAfricaonline.com,
Nigeria360 e-group and
CLASSmagazine. 636 pictures of the event on
www.PhotoWorks.TV http://photoworks.tv/dishnetwork-afrotainment-usafrica-2010dinner-houston

The Vice President of International Programming for DishNetwork Mr. Chris Kuelling,

The CEO of USAfrica multimedia networks Dr. Chido Nwangwu,

The General Manager of Afrotainment Family of Channels Mr. Yves Bollanga,

International Marketing for DishNetwork Ms. Valerie Kalala,

President of the Nigerian Foundation in Houston, Mr. Segun Vaughan,

Friends of Nigeria, and Africa, fellow compatriots, distinguished ladies and gentlemen:

It is indeed my distinct pleasure to be in your midst at this important event, after much rescheduling, given my crowded programme at this time of the year, when many Nigerians are travelling home for the holidays, with their attendant passport and visa requests.

My sincere thanks and congratulations go to the management of the DishNetwork (whose) African Bouquet Channels — in conduction with Afrotainment — we are launching today; with USAfrica as DishNetwork’s consulting partner. It seems to me that this is an initiative whose time has truly come.

1. Let me, therefore, hasten to give credence to Dr. Chido Nwangwu, CEO, USAfrica multimedia networks and the CLASSmagazine. I must confess that it is not easy to turn down a well-meaning request from such an enterprising, young, dynamic and workaholic personality that has succeeded in putting Nigeria first, and Africa, in general, on the forefront of international media reckoning.

2. It would be recalled that only a week today, Monday, December 13th, Dr. Chido Nwangwu won the AfriPro award for 2010, as a recognition of his manifest touch of professionalism in global information technology, with particular reference to Africa, which not least, the foremost information global network, the CNN, has acknowledged.

3.In this critical global information age, I salute the DishNetwork for adding a medium for balanced information sharing about Nigeria in particular, and Africa in general. This is an opportunity that should not be missed because it would allow Africa tell her own story, against the slanted, stereotyped and often uninformed views on African affairs.

4. You are no doubt aware that Africa and her peoples are, even as I speak, portrayed in lurid colours, and the Tarzan image of negativism of never do-wells, because they are presumed to be sub-humans, always afflicted with wars, famine, diseases, and of all things, laziness. In this connection, it was during the 2006 World Economic Summit in Davos, Switzerland, that world leaders and philanthropists showed concern on these biased and jaundiced views about Africa, and called for an immediate change, with a view to presenting a balanced and objective reporting. This explains why the Nigerian Mission in Atlanta is delighted to be a part of this epoch-making event.

Chido . Chris.Chudi . Valerie . Yves_USAfricapix2010

5.  To underscore the significance of this launching, I have been asked to speak briefly on a topical subject ‘The Importance and Growth of Nollywood and African Theme Movies in the Diaspora’.

First, let me admit that I am not an authority on this subject, since I am not a professional filmmaker nor am I in the entertainment industry. I cannot therefore pretend to be didactic, but I am delighted to share some perspectives on the subject. I also believe that perhaps part of the reason for extending an invitation to me could be that my résumé showed that about a half of my public service time has been spent with the Diaspora communities, as I have worked and lived in virtually all regions of the world, beginning with Africa, the Caribbean, Asia, Europe and now the U.S. It is therefore reasonable to assume that I should have something to say in this raging discussion on Nollywood and the African theme movies in the Diaspora.

6. As you may be aware, in nation building, one of the core strategies of national expression and influence is located in the entertainment industry, in which filmmaking stands out, because it has the power to refashion a reality that exists, and attach to it new images that do not exist, and like an advertisement, bring people to believe in its existence. You may call it propaganda, but that is part of the reality of entertainment industry. Indeed, the film industry appropriates the powers of perception, and is therefore able to determine behavior, taste and emotion among people. It amplifies and clarifies national influences that draw from cultural ethos, whereby social behaviours, economic and political beliefs are transmitted and imbibed most passionately.

7. As our take off point therefore, to assert that the ‘Video Movie Industry’, commonly referred to as ‘Home Video’ in Nigeria, is phenomenally successful, is to put it mildly. Talking about the growth of Nollywood and African Theme Movies, lest we forget, what is today known as the Nigerian Film Industry actually started in the 1960s, with ace filmmakers such as Herbert Ogunde and Ola Balogun. Their local productions were then patronized by the theatres, at a time when going to the theatre was in vogue. They were also promoted by both Federal and State television stations.

8. Soon after, about the mid 1980s, filmmakers like Eddy Ugboma and others who studied filmmaking abroad, emerged on the scene to take film business to a higher level. It was however in 1992, to be precise, following the release of ‘Living in Bondage’ by Chris Rapu, that the industry recorded a blockbuster in Nigeria. By the year 2003, the release of ‘Osuofia in London’ which stared the popular Nkem Owoh, which was in many respects like Eddy Murphy’s ‘Coming to America’, catapulted the film industry into international fame, with the promise that the best is yet to come. Ever since, thousands of Home Videos with African themes, have been produced in Nigeria, Ghana, South Africa, and a few other African countries.

9. By providing a platform for information, education and entertainment about Africa, with almost one billion people, and Nigeria in particular, with a population of 150 million people, and the huge Diasporan population, it goes without saying that the profound impact of the Nollywood is felt beyond our wildest imagination. In point of fact, Nollywood is one sector apart from the GSM – telephone industry that has had the fastest growth rate since the Nigerian economy turned the corner. This is supported by the numerous inquiries being received at the Nigerian Missions across the globe, to the effect that something good is indeed coming out of Africa and Nigeria in particular. It is common knowledge that Nigeria’s Nollywood ranks third in the world of motion picture production, after Hollywood and Bollywood.

10. To amplify this point, no one is in doubt that like football, the Home Videos not only unite Nigerians, but has to a large measure succeeded in helping the rebranding effort of the present Administration in Nigeria, as movies from Nigeria are watched in the living rooms and offices across the globe. With about ten million Africans now in the U.S alone, we have a joint responsibility to fill the huge information gap about Africa and her peoples, given our historical, cultural and close economic links with this great and beautiful country. Indeed, it should be said that there are by far many decent, responsible, cultured and highly skilled Africans in the Diaspora compared to very few irresponsible elements in our midst that are being projected on some TV channels as fraudsters and violent. It has to be admitted of course, that every nation has its own share of irresponsible and violent elements.

11. Clearly, given the primacy of information technology, the question about the importance of these African theme movies in this globalizing world, is that they to a large extent determine Africa’s next level of global relevance. With millions of viewing audiences inside Africa and in the Diaspora, Nollywood has created the largest platform of socio-cultural interaction for Africa, as their African themes penetrate and create long lasting memories in the minds and hearts of its viewers. Indeed the effect on the Diaspora is electrifying both for the young and the old.

12. In terms of revenue, the film and video industry in Africa is estimated to have the potential for billions of dollars in foreign exchange. It has also been argued in some informed circles that if properly harnessed; the possibilities that this holds for Nigeria, is even more strategic than the black gold –petroleum, which is not only perishable but also exhaustible. With the progress that Nollywood industry has made so far, it has to be said loud and clear that the 21st century economic progress has to be determined through ideas, I mean, brain power rather than mere reliance on natural resources alone. For example, take China, a globally acknowledged octopus on the economic plane, she still had cause recently to extend invitations to over 500 professionals to assist her translate her huge natural and material resources into ideas. Make no mistake about it, the 21st century is about information technology and market square of ideas, period. Any nation that ignores this does so at its own peril.

13. I tell you, there is a prevalent infectious quiet confidence that Nollywood will open a new and refreshing vista for Africa in the global marketplace, by creating a haven for investment in the continent. This is the opportunity Nollywood should capitalize on, and seize with both hands.

14. It is gratifying that Nollywood and African theme movies are in the ascendancy of positive rating by the global film industry. The talents from Africa in the entertainment industry cut across filmmaking, comedy and music. Again, like football stars, their talents have shut them into international limelight as they are usually given recognition wherever they go. It is common sight at the airports and other public places to give cynosure of attention to top movie celebrities as veritable ambassadors of their countries. It is no wonder therefore, that the time magazine recently reconfirmed the rating of Nollywood as the third largest film production industry in the world.

Distinguished ladies and Gentlemen

15. Like all good things, it is not all sunshine with Nollywood and African theme movies, as it is today being confronted with a lot of challenges. There is the hydra-headed issue of piracy, resulting in low sales. This, I understand, has attracted the concern of the Music Copy Right Society of Nigeria, the Nigerian Copy Right Commission and other similar agencies abroad. It is evident that unless the pirates are checked, they will continue to reap from where they did not sow, and Nollywood will continue to sow without reaping. It is well known that from the European, American, Asian and African cities, piracy of Nollywood movies are on-going and is affecting the dwindling revenue of the artists and producers.

16. Again, there is concern about the quality of production of some of Nollywood movies, in terms of poor packaging and illogical story lines. There is obvious need for appropriate training and retraining of practitioners, to improve quality through technical know-how and setting of minimum standards. It is true that it is an industry that started its trade from VHS to BETACAM cameras and now HD cameras, but Nollywood can do better by bringing in cutting edge technologies.

17. Evidently, every producer in the film industry needs money to make good films, which has been lacking until now. With the recent grant of $200 million to Nollywood by Mr. President, H. E. Goodluck Ebele Jonathan, GCFR, it is hoped that the Nigerian OPS, will compliment this wonderful gesture, from the Government, to ensure that this growing golden industry will put Nigeria where she aspires be in the year 2020. With the value being added to the film industry, I am confident that the 21st century will be the African turn to accomplish the much awaited dream of economic freedom.

18. In light of above, Nollywood can and should portray the fact that Africa is the genesis of civilization and that her wealth, which is largely unexploited, remains the richest of any continent on earth. Nollywood should continue to celebrate Africa and her heritage, her diversities, her many brand names, her history, culture, literature, music and art, and you can add to it. This will enable Diaspora Africans and their many friends to experience the resourcefulness and dynamism of African icons, the beauty and sweet spirit of the continent. Friendship and goodwill apart, no nation, no organization, no one, can tell your story better than yourself.

19. I enjoin Nollywood to celebrate Nigeria’s contributions in building Africa, especially in the liberation struggles of African States of South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. Let Nollywood celebrate the stabilization of sister countries of Liberia and Sierra-Leone, which would have disintegrated as States, but for the fact that young Nigerian soldiers paid for their unity with their blood.

20. The time has come that as Africans, we can no longer afford to be apologetic, but walk tall and tell stories of our heroes and heroines, despite our challenges and our struggles. This is especially in respect of unacknowledged contributions of Africans, for the development of the various regions of the world, and in particular, Europe and the Americas, from the 17th century to date. Nollywood should speak to these historical realities, because the history of Europe and North America cannot be complete without the African umbilical cord connection of blood and sweat.

21. Before I take my seat, let me thank you for listening and for a sumptuous dinner.

22. As I begin in earnest to wind up my affairs as Consul General by end of January 2011, I wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year!

23. God bless.

The Nigeria Maritime Expo (NIMAREX)

This is to inform the general public that the NIGERIA MARITIME EXPO (NIMAREX) will hold in Lagos from March 1-3, 2011.

The event is to serve as a forum to exhibit products, technologies and services for the Maritime sector, and to promote the various business opportunities in Nigeria’s Maritime industry.

Interested persons, agencies, organizations and trade establishments are encouraged to participate.

For  further information you should please check on the  following  website for detaioled brief on the
expo  at  www.nimarex.org.ng

CBN Wants Banks to Report Politicians’ Deals

  • May buy margin loans to boost liquidity
  • GDP growth rate rises to 7.58%

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) is working on a plan to make banks report suspicious cash transactions by politically exposed persons (PEPs).
The banking watchdog boss Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, also said at the end of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) meeting in Abuja on Tuesday 3rd November, 2009, that the CBN might soon start buying margin loans to boost lending.
The proposed banking regulation, which is a draft manual on anti-money laundering, published on the CBN website, will require banks to report large movements of cash between accounts by PEPs.
The banking watchdog defines “politically exposed persons” as individuals who are or have been entrusted with prominent public functions both in Nigeria and foreign countries and those associated with them.
It listed examples of PEPs to include, but not limited to, heads of state or government; governors; local government chairmen; senior politicians; senior government officials; judicial or military officials; senior executives of state-owned corporations; important political party officials; family members or close associates of PEPs; and members of royal families.
The CBN said: “Financial institutions are required, in addition to performing Customer Due Diligence (CDD) measures, to put in place appropriate risk management systems to determine whether a potential customer or existing customer or the beneficial-owner is a politically exposed person.
“Financial institutions are also required to obtain senior management approval before they establish business relationships with a PEP and to render monthly returns on their transactions with PEPs to the CBN and Nigeria Financial Intelligence Unit (NFIU).
“Where a customer has been accepted or has an ongoing relationship with the financial institution and the customer or beneficial-owner is subsequently found to be or becomes a PEP, the financial institution is required to obtain senior management approval in order to continue the business relationship.
“Financial institutions are required to take reasonable measures to establish the source of wealth and the sources of funds of customers and beneficial-owners identified as PEPs and report all anomalies immediately to the CBN and other relevant authorities.”
According to the CBN, a financial institution in a business relationship with a PEP is required to conduct enhanced ongoing monitoring of that relationship.
“In the event of any transaction that is abnormal, FIs are required to flag the account and to report immediately to the CBN and other relevant authorities such as Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC)/NFIU,” it said.
Many PEPs are major shareholders or directors in Nigeria’s banks. Under the regulations, the identities of both individuals and corporate institutions making a transaction above N500,000 and N1,000,000 respectively must be checked.
Briefing newsmen on the outcome of the MPC meeting yesterday, Sanusi said that the proposed legislation setting up an assets management company to buy the loans is expected to be sent to legislators next week.
The purchases would “stimulate activity in the capital market” and improve banks’ balance sheets, Sanusi said.
About N1 trillion of banks’ cash is believed to be trapped in margin loans at the stock market, which has lost over 31 per cent of value so far this year – after losing 45.8 per cent last year.
Sanusi said there would be quantitative easing to bridge the gap currently estimated at about N500 billion between the levels of the current monetary aggregates and the benchmark levels for 2009.
He said the modalities for quantitative easing include investments in bonds is to be issued by the Asset Management Company (AMC).
“The setting up of AMC, however, is subject to the approval of the National Assembly,” he noted.
The CBN governor said that the MPC had also resolved that the purchase of loans by banks under the AMC would be based on terms aimed at strengthening the balance sheets with a focus on asset quality, improving liquidity and capital adequacy as well as on reducing debt overhang relating to the stock market in order to stimulate activity in the capital market.
Sanusi also explained that given the fact that the audit of banks had been concluded and adequate provisions had been made for non-performing loans, the one per cent general provision on performing loans contained in the existing prudential guidelines had been waived for 2009 as a “countercyclical measure”.
The measure, he said, was necessary “to stimulate credit growth and strengthen banks’ balance sheets”.
He said the MPC resolved to leave the Monetary Policy Rate (MPR) unchanged at six per cent but, however, added that an asymmetric corridor of interest rates around the MPR is introduced. The key rate was last cut by 1.75 percentage points last April.
According to him, “the rate on the standing lending facility will remain at 200 basis points above the MPR, while the rate on the standing deposit facility will be 400 basis points below the MPR. With this development, it is expected that secured borrowings and unsecured inter-bank placements will immediately slide downwards to around two per cent per annum.”
In addition, he said, with effect from November 16, 2009, the temporary ban placed by the CBN on the use of Bankers’ Acceptances (BAs) and Commercial Papers (CPs) would be lifted. Guidelines, on that, he said, would be issued by the CBN prior to that date.
He said: “The totality of these measures is aimed at improving system liquidity and financial stability to regenerate confidence in the Nigerian markets and to further stimulate growth.”
Sanusi said the real gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate rose to 7.58 per cent at the end of the third quarter of this year. The GDP, the CBN noted, had grown from 7.22 per cent in the second quarter and 4.5 per cent in the first quarter.
The banking watchdog chief said no decision had been taken on a fixing the tenure for chief executives of commercial banks. Rather, the apex bank said it was still conducting a forensic and diagnostic audit of the banks, which is expected to be ready next week.
He said after the audit is concluded, views would be taken from the Nigeria Deposit Insurance Corporation (NDIC) among other stakeholders and such views would the apex bank to make a decision on the tenure of bank’s chief executives. ,Also, the CBN announced that by the first quarter of 2010, it would release a New Prudential Guidelines on Loans and waived one per cent provision on performing loans contained in the existing prudential guidelines.
Sanusi also expressed delight that the foreign exchange market had been stable.
According to him, “the official exchange rate stood at an average of N149.3578 per US dollar in October 2009. The inter-bank market rate averaged N150.1252/$. There was thus a slight appreciation of the naira during the month. The spread between the rates has continued to be insignificant.”
He said the external reserves rose to $43.34 billion as at the end of September 2009, representing an increase of about $ 1.64 billion over August. He attributed the increase mainly to the receipt of the SDR allocation.
By the end of October, the foreign reserves are provisionally estimated to be $43.05 billion, he said.

CBN Wants Banks to Report Politicians’ Deals
•May buy margin loans to boost liquidity •GDP growth rate rises to 7.58%
The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) is working on a plan to make banks report suspicious cash transactions by politically exposed persons (PEPs).
The banking watchdog boss Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, also said at the end of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) meeting in Abuja on Tuesday 3rd November, 2009, that the CBN might soon start buying margin loans to boost lending.
The proposed banking regulation, which is a draft manual on anti-money laundering, published on the CBN website, will require banks to report large movements of cash between accounts by PEPs.
The banking watchdog defines “politically exposed persons” as individuals who are or have been entrusted with prominent public functions both in Nigeria and foreign countries and those associated with them.
It listed examples of PEPs to include, but not limited to, heads of state or government; governors; local government chairmen; senior politicians; senior government officials; judicial or military officials; senior executives of state-owned corporations; important political party officials; family members or close associates of PEPs; and members of royal families.
The CBN said: “Financial institutions are required, in addition to performing Customer Due Diligence (CDD) measures, to put in place appropriate risk management systems to determine whether a potential customer or existing customer or the beneficial-owner is a politically exposed person.
“Financial institutions are also required to obtain senior management approval before they establish business relationships with a PEP and to render monthly returns on their transactions with PEPs to the CBN and Nigeria Financial Intelligence Unit (NFIU).
“Where a customer has been accepted or has an ongoing relationship with the financial institution and the customer or beneficial-owner is subsequently found to be or becomes a PEP, the financial institution is required to obtain senior management approval in order to continue the business relationship.
“Financial institutions are required to take reasonable measures to establish the source of wealth and the sources of funds of customers and beneficial-owners identified as PEPs and report all anomalies immediately to the CBN and other relevant authorities.”
According to the CBN, a financial institution in a business relationship with a PEP is required to conduct enhanced ongoing monitoring of that relationship.
“In the event of any transaction that is abnormal, FIs are required to flag the account and to report immediately to the CBN and other relevant authorities such as Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC)/NFIU,” it said.
Many PEPs are major shareholders or directors in Nigeria’s banks. Under the regulations, the identities of both individuals and corporate institutions making a transaction above N500,000 and N1,000,000 respectively must be checked.
Briefing newsmen on the outcome of the MPC meeting yesterday, Sanusi said that the proposed legislation setting up an assets management company to buy the loans is expected to be sent to legislators next week.
The purchases would “stimulate activity in the capital market” and improve banks’ balance sheets, Sanusi said.
About N1 trillion of banks’ cash is believed to be trapped in margin loans at the stock market, which has lost over 31 per cent of value so far this year – after losing 45.8 per cent last year.
Sanusi said there would be quantitative easing to bridge the gap currently estimated at about N500 billion between the levels of the current monetary aggregates and the benchmark levels for 2009.
He said the modalities for quantitative easing include investments in bonds is to be issued by the Asset Management Company (AMC).
“The setting up of AMC, however, is subject to the approval of the National Assembly,” he noted.
The CBN governor said that the MPC had also resolved that the purchase of loans by banks under the AMC would be based on terms aimed at strengthening the balance sheets with a focus on asset quality, improving liquidity and capital adequacy as well as on reducing debt overhang relating to the stock market in order to stimulate activity in the capital market.
Sanusi also explained that given the fact that the audit of banks had been concluded and adequate provisions had been made for non-performing loans, the one per cent general provision on performing loans contained in the existing prudential guidelines had been waived for 2009 as a “countercyclical measure”.
The measure, he said, was necessary “to stimulate credit growth and strengthen banks’ balance sheets”.
He said the MPC resolved to leave the Monetary Policy Rate (MPR) unchanged at six per cent but, however, added that an asymmetric corridor of interest rates around the MPR is introduced. The key rate was last cut by 1.75 percentage points last April.
According to him, “the rate on the standing lending facility will remain at 200 basis points above the MPR, while the rate on the standing deposit facility will be 400 basis points below the MPR. With this development, it is expected that secured borrowings and unsecured inter-bank placements will immediately slide downwards to around two per cent per annum.”
In addition, he said, with effect from November 16, 2009, the temporary ban placed by the CBN on the use of Bankers’ Acceptances (BAs) and Commercial Papers (CPs) would be lifted. Guidelines, on that, he said, would be issued by the CBN prior to that date.
He said: “The totality of these measures is aimed at improving system liquidity and financial stability to regenerate confidence in the Nigerian markets and to further stimulate growth.”
Sanusi said the real gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate rose to 7.58 per cent at the end of the third quarter of this year. The GDP, the CBN noted, had grown from 7.22 per cent in the second quarter and 4.5 per cent in the first quarter.
The banking watchdog chief said no decision had been taken on a fixing the tenure for chief executives of commercial banks. Rather, the apex bank said it was still conducting a forensic and diagnostic audit of the banks, which is expected to be ready next week.
He said after the audit is concluded, views would be taken from the Nigeria Deposit Insurance Corporation (NDIC) among other stakeholders and such views would the apex bank to make a decision on the tenure of bank’s chief executives. ,Also, the CBN announced that by the first quarter of 2010, it would release a New Prudential Guidelines on Loans and waived one per cent provision on performing loans contained in the existing prudential guidelines.
Sanusi also expressed delight that the foreign exchange market had been stable.
According to him, “the official exchange rate stood at an average of N149.3578 per US dollar in October 2009. The inter-bank market rate averaged N150.1252/$. There was thus a slight appreciation of the naira during the month. The spread between the rates has continued to be insignificant.”
He said the external reserves rose to $43.34 billion as at the end of September 2009, representing an increase of about $ 1.64 billion over August. He attributed the increase mainly to the receipt of the SDR allocation.
By the end of October, the foreign reserves are provisionally estimated to be $43.05 billion, he said.
FG okays Anambra cargo airport
The Federal Government has approved the construction of a cargo/passenger airport in Anambra State.
The authority for the construction of the project was conveyed to the state government by the Federal Ministry of Aviation.
The Anambra state Commissioner for Information, Chief Maja Umeh, who disclosed this to journalists in Awka on tuesday 3rd November, 2009, said the state government had acquired a piece of land for the project.
The planned airport, according to Umeh, would be cited at Ifite-Umuleri in Anambra East Local Council. It will
be jointly executed by the state government and Orient Petroleum Resources Ltd.

CBN Wants Banks to Report Politicians’ Deals
•May buy margin loans to boost liquidity •GDP growth rate rises to 7.58%
The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) is working on a plan to make banks report suspicious cash transactions by politically exposed persons (PEPs).
The banking watchdog boss Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, also said at the end of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) meeting in Abuja on Tuesday 3rd November, 2009, that the CBN might soon start buying margin loans to boost lending.
The proposed banking regulation, which is a draft manual on anti-money laundering, published on the CBN website, will require banks to report large movements of cash between accounts by PEPs.
The banking watchdog defines “politically exposed persons” as individuals who are or have been entrusted with prominent public functions both in Nigeria and foreign countries and those associated with them.
It listed examples of PEPs to include, but not limited to, heads of state or government; governors; local government chairmen; senior politicians; senior government officials; judicial or military officials; senior executives of state-owned corporations; important political party officials; family members or close associates of PEPs; and members of royal families.
The CBN said: “Financial institutions are required, in addition to performing Customer Due Diligence (CDD) measures, to put in place appropriate risk management systems to determine whether a potential customer or existing customer or the beneficial-owner is a politically exposed person.
“Financial institutions are also required to obtain senior management approval before they establish business relationships with a PEP and to render monthly returns on their transactions with PEPs to the CBN and Nigeria Financial Intelligence Unit (NFIU).
“Where a customer has been accepted or has an ongoing relationship with the financial institution and the customer or beneficial-owner is subsequently found to be or becomes a PEP, the financial institution is required to obtain senior management approval in order to continue the business relationship.
“Financial institutions are required to take reasonable measures to establish the source of wealth and the sources of funds of customers and beneficial-owners identified as PEPs and report all anomalies immediately to the CBN and other relevant authorities.”
According to the CBN, a financial institution in a business relationship with a PEP is required to conduct enhanced ongoing monitoring of that relationship.
“In the event of any transaction that is abnormal, FIs are required to flag the account and to report immediately to the CBN and other relevant authorities such as Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC)/NFIU,” it said.
Many PEPs are major shareholders or directors in Nigeria’s banks. Under the regulations, the identities of both individuals and corporate institutions making a transaction above N500,000 and N1,000,000 respectively must be checked.
Briefing newsmen on the outcome of the MPC meeting yesterday, Sanusi said that the proposed legislation setting up an assets management company to buy the loans is expected to be sent to legislators next week.
The purchases would “stimulate activity in the capital market” and improve banks’ balance sheets, Sanusi said.
About N1 trillion of banks’ cash is believed to be trapped in margin loans at the stock market, which has lost over 31 per cent of value so far this year – after losing 45.8 per cent last year.
Sanusi said there would be quantitative easing to bridge the gap currently estimated at about N500 billion between the levels of the current monetary aggregates and the benchmark levels for 2009.
He said the modalities for quantitative easing include investments in bonds is to be issued by the Asset Management Company (AMC).
“The setting up of AMC, however, is subject to the approval of the National Assembly,” he noted.
The CBN governor said that the MPC had also resolved that the purchase of loans by banks under the AMC would be based on terms aimed at strengthening the balance sheets with a focus on asset quality, improving liquidity and capital adequacy as well as on reducing debt overhang relating to the stock market in order to stimulate activity in the capital market.
Sanusi also explained that given the fact that the audit of banks had been concluded and adequate provisions had been made for non-performing loans, the one per cent general provision on performing loans contained in the existing prudential guidelines had been waived for 2009 as a “countercyclical measure”.
The measure, he said, was necessary “to stimulate credit growth and strengthen banks’ balance sheets”.
He said the MPC resolved to leave the Monetary Policy Rate (MPR) unchanged at six per cent but, however, added that an asymmetric corridor of interest rates around the MPR is introduced. The key rate was last cut by 1.75 percentage points last April.
According to him, “the rate on the standing lending facility will remain at 200 basis points above the MPR, while the rate on the standing deposit facility will be 400 basis points below the MPR. With this development, it is expected that secured borrowings and unsecured inter-bank placements will immediately slide downwards to around two per cent per annum.”
In addition, he said, with effect from November 16, 2009, the temporary ban placed by the CBN on the use of Bankers’ Acceptances (BAs) and Commercial Papers (CPs) would be lifted. Guidelines, on that, he said, would be issued by the CBN prior to that date.
He said: “The totality of these measures is aimed at improving system liquidity and financial stability to regenerate confidence in the Nigerian markets and to further stimulate growth.”
Sanusi said the real gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate rose to 7.58 per cent at the end of the third quarter of this year. The GDP, the CBN noted, had grown from 7.22 per cent in the second quarter and 4.5 per cent in the first quarter.
The banking watchdog chief said no decision had been taken on a fixing the tenure for chief executives of commercial banks. Rather, the apex bank said it was still conducting a forensic and diagnostic audit of the banks, which is expected to be ready next week.
He said after the audit is concluded, views would be taken from the Nigeria Deposit Insurance Corporation (NDIC) among other stakeholders and such views would the apex bank to make a decision on the tenure of bank’s chief executives. ,Also, the CBN announced that by the first quarter of 2010, it would release a New Prudential Guidelines on Loans and waived one per cent provision on performing loans contained in the existing prudential guidelines.
Sanusi also expressed delight that the foreign exchange market had been stable.
According to him, “the official exchange rate stood at an average of N149.3578 per US dollar in October 2009. The inter-bank market rate averaged N150.1252/$. There was thus a slight appreciation of the naira during the month. The spread between the rates has continued to be insignificant.”
He said the external reserves rose to $43.34 billion as at the end of September 2009, representing an increase of about $ 1.64 billion over August. He attributed the increase mainly to the receipt of the SDR allocation.
By the end of October, the foreign reserves are provisionally estimated to be $43.05 billion, he said.

 

  1. This to inform that the federal Government has concluded all necessary arrangements for the issuance of the Nigerian Diaspora Bond In the International Capital Market. For more details Click Here
  2. The General Public is hereby notified that LYNXSYS: An IT Firm/Consultant with a web site domain name NIGERIANPASSPORTNOW.COM who purportedly acts and renders Consular, Visa, Payment Confirmation and Express Delivery services on behalf of the Consultant is a Hoax and should be avoided. 
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  6. By this development, all submissions of visa applications and payments will henceforth be handled by aforementioned office, starting from Monday, May 16, 2016. Please note that, from the above stated date (May 16, 2016) the Consulate will cease to collect any visa applications and payments.